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Mol Path 51:55-61 doi:10.1136/mp.51.2.55

Response of tumour cells to hypoxia: role of p53 and NFkB.

  1. J A Royds,
  2. S K Dower,
  3. E E Qwarnstrom,
  4. C E Lewis
  1. Institute of Cancer Studies, University of Sheffield Medical School, UK.

      Abstract

      Hypoxia is present in several areas of malignant tumours and is thought to result from an inadequate rate of tumour angiogenesis, vascular collapse, or both. The presence and extent of these hypoxic tumour microenvironments have recently been shown to influence tumour progression by regulating both tumour cell survival and the expression of key angiogenic molecules. Recent studies have suggested that mutations in the tumour suppressor gene, p53, may play an important role in regulating the adaptive response of tumour cells to hypoxia by enhancing their survival and release of proangiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor. It has even been suggested that hypoxia may select for the survival of the more malignant clones harbouring such genetic defects as mutations in p53. Recently, the transcription factor, NFkB, has also been implicated as a novel mediator of the effects of hypoxia and reoxygenation in tumour cells. This article reviews some of the molecular mechanisms subserving the responses of tumour cells to hypoxic stress, particularly the role and relation of NFkB and p53 in regulating this phenomenon.